Wanda Waldera
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Density

This project came about in response to my feelings about our planet being altered at an accelerating pace.  World population is exploding, every spare piece of land is overbuilt and exploited, our resources are dwindling and/or are polluted, greed and disrespect for our natural world as well as life itself is the norm.  As humans continue to procreate, conquer the planet and impose manmade order, we are left with the poverty of homogeneity and disorder. The majority of us have to travel someplace else to experience nature, whether it is a city park, a nature preserve, or an area set aside as open space. 

We think of badlands as places that are barren and uninhabitable:  bleak, harsh places formed by nature.  These works question what really are the badlands.  Are they what we consider deserts and wastelands, or are they the sprawl and chaos of the ghettos and slums that have replaced our beautiful, diverse planet? 

These works express my emotional response to that poverty of sprawl and manmade chaos, and are also personal metaphors for loss and change.


Night Works

This body of work is an exploration of the night, a world of light and shadow. Some works are inspired by the night sky and its vastness and mystery. Others consider how artificial and natural light transform the night landscape, and how perception is altered, imagination triggered, and emotions heightened. A tree may become a sinister being or foliage playful beautiful forms bejeweled by light. 
I am intrigued by the energy a city creates, and how the night emphasizes the way a city stretches up and out, defining itself by light. The images in the “Night Circuit” series are aerial views of a city described by light. The title is also a play on words: night circuit describes human activity and also alludes to the images’ complexity of color and form. The images in the “Night-Cityscape” series were inspired by visits to cities such as San Francisco and Seattle and not only explore how a city interrupts the night landscape, but the interaction of a city’s light on bodies of water.
Together all of these approaches celebrate the wonder, mystery and beauty of the night. 
 
Pop Noir
 
Contemporary society is bombarded by visual images. This is most notably found on the internet, but also extends to television, print media and film. The inspiration for this body of work arose from that phenomenon. I am interested in how the juxtaposition of seemingly unrelated images has the potential to create a new visual language. In this series of mixed media works, my intention is to depict everyday images in new and often menacing relationships, or dreamlike states that often allude to an obscure plot. Balanced compositions are offset by contrasting images of heads, smiles, arms, legs, hands and other body parts, common objects, people engaged in activities such as singing or dancing, animals, numbers, painted or drawn gestures and muted color. The combination of these elements not only adds up to strange, erotic, ambivalent and sometimes ominous scenes, but contributes to an overriding feeling of entropy. Things are falling apart as much as they are coming together, and organization often degrades into randomness and chaos. It is this dichotomy of organization and randomness, and how the human mind attempts to make sense of, find relationships between, or formulate a narrative from, unrelated images that most interests me and informs these works.
 
Nature

I view this  work as a search for images that portray moments and experiences with nature.  It celebrates my deep, ancestral love of the land, nature’s amazing vitality and variety, and exposes my encounters with natural forces, one of which is water.

Some works reflect remembrances of my childhood growing up in a small, coastal, rural town surrounded by the sea, forests, fields, streams, lakes, rivers and wild creatures.  Others point to easily dismissed or overlooked elements in our lives:  the magic of finding a nesting bird; the elaborate task honey bees undertake to build their hives and the power they wield as a collective society; the wonder of putting a seed in the earth, having it grow and produce food.  My work is about this wonder and the fragility and preciousness of all life forms.  For me, the images are also metaphors for my struggles to balance my roles in the natural world and in the complex world of technology, as well as my search for a more basic, natural way of living - a life that depends upon a dynamic balance.

Other work is inspired by my involvement with planting and restoring the gardens around our home and studios.  Many images such as ladybugs, birds, dragonflies and bees are references to some of the life found in and around the garden. Some images echo my experiences in nature growing up in rural New England, while others quote memories of things I wish were in the garden such as amphibians, which were plentiful when I was a child, and are now rare, endangered.

I like to create images that talk about my personal moments in nature: the rhythm of the ocean, the music of spring water rushing through a gorge, the magic of working the land, the way the night sky moves us and binds us to the universe, the incredible power of the elements.  I like to use images that reflect my direct experiences of nature.

I often juxtapose repeating shapes, which suggest basic building units, and textures derived from nature with abstract patterns and more realistic images.  My canvases may also include other contemporary symbols, pure painterly play, and references to the landscape, to evoke again the emotional power of their primal origins and importance.  My intention is to create a play of similarities and differences, contradictions and affirmations, which examines the link between memory and image, image and meaning, meaning and power.


New Maps
 

The inspiration for these paintings arose from my interest in maps and mapping that began with my series of works, “Night Circuits.”  I am interested in the visual power of images derived from mapping that are outside the strict constraints of geography.  Mapping is about abstract relationships:  the creation of a kind of intellectual space, a rich quiet place that engages reason and stimulates imagination.
 
I am intrigued with beginnings and endings, organizing and systematizing visual information, and metaphorical extensions of map conventions.  These maps, rather than establishing boundaries, show how arbitrary and flexible they really are. The viewer must find his or her own boundries.  Some pieces can be seen as derivative of aerial views of geographical information, some as maps of neuronal connections, some as systems of symbols that may represent assigned or secret meanings and yet others as celestial charts.
 
All in all, these works express my personal investigations and private journeys.